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aAreas for greater depths can be found by adding columns. For example, the area of a 5-ft diameter pit, 15 ft deep is equal to 157 + 79, or 236 ft. ^Diameter of excavation.

Source: Design Manual, Onsite Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems, U.S. EPA, October 1980, p. 237.

aAreas for greater depths can be found by adding columns. For example, the area of a 5-ft diameter pit, 15 ft deep is equal to 157 + 79, or 236 ft. ^Diameter of excavation.

Source: Design Manual, Onsite Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems, U.S. EPA, October 1980, p. 237.

prohibit the installation of cesspools because pollution could easily travel from cesspools to wells used for water supply. Where cesspools are allowed, they should be located downgradient and 200 to 500 feet away from sources of water. The bottom of the cesspool should be at least 4 feet above the highest ground-water level. Cesspool construction is the same as a leaching pit. The cesspool system can be made more efficient under such circumstances by providing a tee outlet, as shown in Figure 3.6, with the overflow discharging to an absorption field or leaching pit. A preferable alternative would be to replace the cesspool with a septic tank and absorption field.

Dry Well

A dry well, which is constructed in the same way as a leaching pit, is used where the subsoil is relatively porous for the underground disposal of clear rainwater, surface water, or groundwater from roofs and/or basement floor drains. Roof or basement drainage should never be discharged to a septic tank because its volume will seriously overload such systems. Dry wells should not be used for the disposal of toilet, bath, laundry, or kitchen wastes. These wastes should be discharged to a septic tank. In some cases, roof drainage may be discharged to a nearby watercourse if permitted by local regulations. Dry wells should be located at least 50 feet from any water well, 20 feet from any leaching portion of a sewage disposal system, and 10 feet or more from building foundations or footings.

FIGURE 3.6 Leaching pit details.
Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable.

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