Properties of Geological Materials and Their Bearing on Recharge and Groundwater Storage

Infiltration of recharge water occurs through interconnected pores, open joints and fissures, or combinations of these features (Fig. 3.2). In contrast, rocks rich in pores that are too small or isolated from each other, nonporous rocks, and rocks with no open fissures are inefficient for infiltration and

Fig. 3.1 Two aquifers of nonsaliferous rocks, separated by an aquiclude of clay with gypsum and salt rock. (I) fully perforated and producing saline water; (II) stopped at a safe distance above the clay, abstracting good water from the upper aquifer alone; (III) sealed for several meters above and below the clay bed, producing good water from both aquifers.

Fig. 3.1 Two aquifers of nonsaliferous rocks, separated by an aquiclude of clay with gypsum and salt rock. (I) fully perforated and producing saline water; (II) stopped at a safe distance above the clay, abstracting good water from the upper aquifer alone; (III) sealed for several meters above and below the clay bed, producing good water from both aquifers.

recharge. The same principles hold true for water movement and water storage in aquifers. Rocks with open interconnected pores and open interconnected fissures are best for recharge and storage.

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